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Digital Doesn't Exist

Yep.  There is no such thing as digital stuff.  You're probably thinking I'm a moron right about now.  "Computers are digital aren't they?"  No.  They're not.  Here's why:

Digital is defined as being ridiculously definite. . .   every pulse of electricity that flows through the electrical components of processors and other semi conductors has a leading edge and a trailing edge, where for a very brief amount of time, the signal signifies something that is between a low [0] and a high [1].  Granted, this is all pointless because the device that is being switched can only be in 2 positions, and there is a threshold there of when that device determines that the signal is either a low or a high, but it's still not a digital signal.  Digital is logical.  It's not tangible.

While we're on the topic. . . .  data doesn't exist either.  When you look at a spreadsheet or database with a bunch of stuff in it, you're not seeing your data, you're seeing a representation of the data.  The stuff stored in the actual files and variables are just representations of the data as well.  Data, is also logical, and not tangible.

Kinda makes you wonder if our thoughts exist, doesn't it?  Do thoughts exist, or are thoughts really just representations of something deeper?

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